PRIME Engineering & Environmental Building ServicesAsbestos, Lead, Radon Testing

Lead

Lead is a highly toxic metal that was used for many years in products found in and around our homes. Lead may cause a range of health effects, from behavioral problems and learning disabilities, to seizures and death. Children 6 years old and under are most at risk, because their bodies are growing quickly.

Research suggests that the primary sources of lead exposure for most children are:

  • deteriorating lead-based paint,
  • lead contaminated dust, and
  • lead contaminated residential soil.

EPA is playing a major role in addressing these residential lead hazards. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 1978 there were 13.5 million children in the United States with elevated blood lead levels (i.e., 10µg/dl). By 2002, that number had dropped to 310,000 kids. While we still have a significant challenge, EPA is very proud of how federal, state, tribal, and private sector partners have coordinated efforts with the public to better protect our children.

Since the 1980's, EPA and its federal partners have phased out lead in gasoline, reduced lead in drinking water, reduced lead in industrial air pollution, and banned or limited lead used in consumer products, including residential paint. States and municipalities have set up programs to identify and treat lead poisoned children and to rehabilitate deteriorated housing. Parents, too, have greatly helped to reduce lead exposures to their children by cleaning and maintaining homes, having their children's blood lead levels checked, and promoting proper nutrition.

Contact us for further information about testing for lead, fees, and turnaround time for results.

Asbestos

What is Asbestos?

Asbestos is a tiny fiber that was used in the past primarily as insulation. It was also added to some building materials to provide added strength and flame resistance. The problem with asbestos is that it has been shown to cause lung cancer and mesothelioma in individuals that were exposed to large amounts of free-floating asbestos fibers in the air. These conditions typically did not become apparent until around 30 years after the exposure. Because of the health hazards of asbestos fibers, its use in insulation and paint was banned in the 1970’s.

What you need to know

Homes built prior to the 1970’s could contain asbestos in insulation, plumbing, paint, wall joint compound, and other building materials. However, as long as the materials are in good condition, they pose no danger. Asbestos is only a threat if the fibers are released into the air and can be inhaled. Renovations or demolitions of materials containing asbestos can release the fibers into the air. Therefore, the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) requires the owner of any property containing asbestos building materials to get an asbestos inspection prior to any demolitions or renovations of that property.

How can asbestos be removed?

If your home contains asbestos, you have two options: removal of the material or sealing the material to prevent it from releasing fibers. Either option requires the help of a trained professional. How do I know if my home contains asbestos? If you suspect your home or a home you are considering buying may contain asbestos, it’s vital you get a thorough inspection by a qualified professional. Asbestos can only be detected by a special microscope. Our inspectors are trained in asbestos detection and will take samples from your home for further analysis. Please contact our office for further information.

Radon Gas

There are cracks in the foundation; nothing structural, nothing that is going to threaten the stability of the home.  But, they are there; nooks, crannies and holes through which seeps the invisible threat or radon gas. Colorless, odorless and undetectable by humans, it is nonetheless the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.

Radon gas is created when uranium in the soil decays. The gas then seeps through any access point into a home. Common entry points are cracks in the foundation, poorly sealed pipes, drainage or any other loose point. Once in the home, the gas can collect in certain areas especially basements and other low-lying, closed areas and build up over time to dangerous levels. The Environmental Protection Agency of the US Government has set a threshold of 4 pico curies per liter as the safe level. As humans are exposed to the gas over a period of years, it can have a significant and detrimental effect.

How widespread is the problem? Radon has been found in homes in all 50 states. Certain areas are more susceptible than others but no location is immune. Concentrations of radon-causing materials in the soil can be either natural or man-made. Homes built near historic mining operations may be at higher risk. The only way to tell for sure is to have a home tested.

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PRIME Engineering & Environmental Building Services

2801 Ocean Drive, Suite 101
Vero Beach, FL 32963
Phone: (772) 410–3752

2263 West New Haven Avenue
Melbourne, FL 32904
Phone: (321) 574-5503

10380 SW Village Center Drive
Port St. Lucie, FL 34987
Phone: (772) 237-3520

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Engineering & Evironmental Building Services, Vero Beach, FL

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